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Clarifying idioms

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Idioms that help to clear up confusion are often referred to as clarifying idioms. These idioms are used to make something clearer or more easily understood by providing additional context or explanation.

Straighten out the kinks

It is an idiom that means to solve a problem or resolve a difficult situation. The phrase “straightening out” is used to convey the idea of making something smooth, orderly, and easy to understand. The word “kinks” is used as a metaphor for problems or difficulties that need to be resolved. The idiom suggests that solving problems and resolving difficulties is similar to straightening out a kinked rope or hose, which is a difficult task. This idiom is often used in situations where there are obstacles or complications that need to be resolved before moving forward. The origin of the idiom “straightening out the kinks” is uncertain, but it is likely that it comes from the practice of straightening out a kinked rope or hose. A kinked rope or hose is difficult to handle and it can cause problems if not fixed, this is similar to problems or difficulties in life, they can cause hindrance and need to be resolved. The phrase was likely adopted as a metaphor for solving problems or resolving difficulties because it evokes the image of untangling something that is knotted or twisted. The phrase is first recorded in the late 19th century, and it is often used to describe someone who is facing a difficult situation and is working to resolve it.

Iron out the wrinkles

The idiom “ironing out the wrinkles” means to solve a problem or resolve a difficult situation. The phrase “Ironing out” is used to convey the idea of making something smooth, orderly, and easy to understand. The word “wrinkles” is used as a metaphor for problems or difficulties that need to be resolved. The idiom suggests that solving problems and resolving difficulties is similar to ironing out wrinkles on a piece of clothing, which is a task that makes something smooth and presentable. The phrase is first recorded in the early 20th century, and it is often used to describe someone who is facing a difficult situation and is working to resolve it. The origin of this idiom is likely comes from the domestic task of ironing clothes, when you iron clothes, you remove the wrinkles, thus making them smooth and presentable, this metaphor is used in a similar way to describe solving problems and resolving difficulties.

Sort out the mess

The idiom “sorting out the mess” means to resolve a confusing or difficult situation or problem. The phrase “sorting out” implies the act of organizing and putting in order, the word “mess” is used as a metaphor for something that is chaotic, disorganized, and hard to understand. The idiom suggests that resolving a situation or problem is similar to sorting out a messy room, which is a task that requires organization and attention to detail. The origin of this idiom is uncertain, it may have originated from the common phrase “to make a mess” which means to create a chaotic or disordered situation, and “sorting out” is the opposite of that, it means to put things in order, to fix a problem, to resolve a situation that is not in a good shape. This idiom is often used to describe someone who is trying to fix a problem or resolve a difficult situation, it implies a sense of control and organization over the situation.

Unscramble the eggs

The idiom “Unscrambling the eggs” is used to convey the meaning of making sense of something that is confusing or complex. The phrase “unscrambling” implies the act of separating and organizing, the word “eggs” is used as a metaphor for something that is mixed up or hard to understand. The idiom suggests that making sense of something is similar to unscrambling eggs, which is a task that requires separating the yolk from the whites, and order to make something that is usable. The origin of this idiom is uncertain, but it likely comes from the common practice of cooking eggs in which eggs are scrambled, and then they need to be unscrambled, this metaphor has been used to express the idea of making sense of something that is complex or hard to understand. This idiom is often used to describe someone who is trying to understand something that is confusing or difficult.

Clear the haze

The idiom “Clearing the haze” is used to convey the meaning of removing confusion or uncertainty. The phrase “clearing” implies the act of making something visible or understood, the word “haze” is used as a metaphor for something that is difficult to see through, or hard to understand. The idiom suggests that resolving a situation or problem is similar to clearing a haze, which is a task that requires removing something that is blocking visibility and making something visible. The origin of this idiom is uncertain, but it likely comes from the common experience of weather conditions, specifically when there is a haze that covers the visibility and it’s hard to see through it. The phrase is often used to describe someone who is trying to resolve a situation that is not clear or uncertain, it implies a sense of making something visible or understandable.

Remove the fog

The idiom “removing the fog” is used to convey the idea of making something clear or easy to understand. The phrase “removing” implies the act of taking away something that is blocking visibility or understanding, the word “fog” is used as a metaphor for something that is difficult to see through or hard to understand. The idiom suggests that resolving a situation or problem is similar to removing a fog, which is a task that requires taking away something that is obscuring visibility and making something visible. The origin of this idiom is uncertain, but it likely comes from the common experience of weather conditions, specifically when there is a fog that covers the visibility and it’s hard to see through it. The phrase is often used to describe someone who is trying to resolve a situation that is not clear or uncertain, it implies a sense of making something visible or understandable.

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